Privileged Aspects

When you are using Aspect-Oriented Programming with AspectJ and you want to get around Java restrictions in your Aspect, you can declare the Aspect “privileged“.

Say you perform some logging from your Aspect, but the member you want to access has no (public) accessor method. You could create a public getter method and use that. Better would be to make the Aspect privileged so it can access the member even though it is declared private. This scenario is demonstrated in the snippets below.

Given the following class “Foo”.

  1. ppublic class Foo {
  2.     private String bar;
  3.  
  4.     private void doSomething() {
  5.         bar = "bar";
  6.     }
  7. }

The Aspect would look something like this.

  1. public privileged aspect FooLogging {
  2.     protected pointcut myClass(): within(Foo);
  3.     private pointcut doSomethingMethod(): myClass()
  4.             && execution(doSomething());
  5.  
  6.     after(): doSomethingMethod() {
  7.         String value = ((Foo) (thisJoinPoint.getThis())).bar;
  8.         // Logging goes here.
  9.     }
  10. }

There is one limitation to privileged Aspects though:

Privileged aspects are not supported by the annotation style.

See “Aspect Declarations” in “Chapter 9. An Annotation Based Development Style” of the “The AspectJ 5 Dev Kit Developer’s Notebook“.